E-Supervision of Graduate Students in Speech-Language Pathology: Preliminary Research Findings E-supervision is a method of supervision that uses videoconferencing technology to provide real-time supervision to supervisees who are engaged in various clinical activities. More and more, higher education institutions are using e-supervision with their graduate students in order to gain access to clinical externships sites where onsite supervision is limited ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 2012
E-Supervision of Graduate Students in Speech-Language Pathology: Preliminary Research Findings
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Charles H. Carlin
    The University of Akron, Akron, OH
  • Disclosure: Charles H. Carlin has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Charles H. Carlin has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Articles
Article   |   September 01, 2012
E-Supervision of Graduate Students in Speech-Language Pathology: Preliminary Research Findings
SIG 18 Perspectives on Telepractice, September 2012, Vol. 2, 26-30. doi:10.1044/tele2.1.26
SIG 18 Perspectives on Telepractice, September 2012, Vol. 2, 26-30. doi:10.1044/tele2.1.26

E-supervision is a method of supervision that uses videoconferencing technology to provide real-time supervision to supervisees who are engaged in various clinical activities. More and more, higher education institutions are using e-supervision with their graduate students in order to gain access to clinical externships sites where onsite supervision is limited or non-existent. For the busy supervisor, e-supervision allows multiple individuals to be supervised without having to allocate time in the day for travel between observation sites. Currently, there is a lack of research in the field on supervisors' and graduate students' perceptions of e-supervision. The purpose of this pilot project was to identify perceptions of e-supervision when it was used with graduate students who were placed in hard-to-fill schools districts throughout Ohio. Supervisors kept supervision logs and participated in interviews. Preliminary data showed the participants generally felt the project was a success. The supervisors believed that the graduate students received an adequate amount of supervision, and this supervision was extended across a variety of professional activities. For the graduate students, they reported they felt fully supported during their placement, and e-supervision compared favorably to past face-to-face supervision experiences. Recommendations for future projects were provided by the participants in the study.

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