Getting Started in Audiology Telepractice Audiology telepractice has become a reliable and effective service delivery model that benefits patients and caregivers by reducing patient and clinician travel time and related costs, improving patient adherence to appointments, decreasing wait times for service, and enhancing geographic access to comprehensive hearing care, especially for patients living in rural ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2013
Getting Started in Audiology Telepractice
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Chad Gladden
    William S. Middleton Memorial VA Hospital, Madison, WI
  • Disclosure: Chad Gladden has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Chad Gladden has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2013
Getting Started in Audiology Telepractice
SIG 18 Perspectives on Telepractice, April 2013, Vol. 3, 16-22. doi:10.1044/tele3.1.16
SIG 18 Perspectives on Telepractice, April 2013, Vol. 3, 16-22. doi:10.1044/tele3.1.16

Audiology telepractice has become a reliable and effective service delivery model that benefits patients and caregivers by reducing patient and clinician travel time and related costs, improving patient adherence to appointments, decreasing wait times for service, and enhancing geographic access to comprehensive hearing care, especially for patients living in rural areas (Dennis, Gladden, & Noe, 2012). The growing national network of experienced and expert telehealth practitioners, positive outcome data, and refinement of practice guidelines and standards have made “getting started in audiology telepractice” an important and achievable goal for audiologists. Developing an audiology telepractice is a highly systematic multidisciplinary process that requires a commitment to collaboration, creating effective communication networks, and ongoing coordination of team activities. A foundation of strong administrative and clinical leadership and “buy-in” are keys to success during all phases of audiology telepractice planning and implementation. A realistic assessment of patient service needs/trends, institutional goals and resources, staffing, space, and technical demands is required and necessitates the active engagement of a diverse collaborative core team. Ongoing advancements in teleaudiology suggest that, despite multiple challenges, emerging patient needs will continue to push this service delivery model forward.

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