Parents' Perspectives on Tele-AAC Support for Families with a New Speech Generating Device: Results from an Australian Pilot Study Telepractice is rapidly gaining popularity as a cost-effective and convenient alternative to in-person services for a range of speech-language pathology (SLP) applications. To date, there has been little research investigating the use of telepractice to support families with a new speech generating device (SGD). This paper reports on the outcomes ... Article
Article  |   September 2014
Parents' Perspectives on Tele-AAC Support for Families with a New Speech Generating Device: Results from an Australian Pilot Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kate Anderson
    Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales, Australia
  • Susan Balandin
    School of Health & Social Development, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Roger J. Stancliffe
    Centre for Disability Research and Policy, University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales, Australia
  • Claire Layfield
    Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales, Australia
  • Financial Disclosure: Kate Anderson is a Doctoral Candidate with the Disability and Community Faculty Research Group at the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Australia. Susan Balandin is the Inaugural Chair in Disability and Inclusion in the School of Health and Social Development, Faculty of Health, at Deakin University. Roger J. Stancliffe is Professor of Intellectual Disability at the Centre for Disability Research and Policy at the University of Sydney, Australia. Claire Layfield is a Doctoral Candidate with the Disability and Community Faculty Research Group at the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Australia
    Financial Disclosure: Kate Anderson is a Doctoral Candidate with the Disability and Community Faculty Research Group at the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Australia. Susan Balandin is the Inaugural Chair in Disability and Inclusion in the School of Health and Social Development, Faculty of Health, at Deakin University. Roger J. Stancliffe is Professor of Intellectual Disability at the Centre for Disability Research and Policy at the University of Sydney, Australia. Claire Layfield is a Doctoral Candidate with the Disability and Community Faculty Research Group at the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Australia×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Kate Anderson has previously published in the subject area. Susan Balandin has previously published in the subject area. Roger J. Stancliffe has previously published in the subject area. Claire Layfield has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Kate Anderson has previously published in the subject area. Susan Balandin has previously published in the subject area. Roger J. Stancliffe has previously published in the subject area. Claire Layfield has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article.×
  • © 2014 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Articles
Article   |   September 2014
Parents' Perspectives on Tele-AAC Support for Families with a New Speech Generating Device: Results from an Australian Pilot Study
SIG 18 Perspectives on Telepractice, September 2014, Vol. 4, 52-60. doi:10.1044/teles4.2.52
SIG 18 Perspectives on Telepractice, September 2014, Vol. 4, 52-60. doi:10.1044/teles4.2.52

Telepractice is rapidly gaining popularity as a cost-effective and convenient alternative to in-person services for a range of speech-language pathology (SLP) applications. To date, there has been little research investigating the use of telepractice to support families with a new speech generating device (SGD). This paper reports on the outcomes of a novel online training and support program, trialed with 4 underserviced Australian families of children with a new SGD. The program consisted of 6 video-narrated lessons on SGD use, along with an online supervision and practice component conducted via videoconference. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with parents following their completion of the program. Parents noted the telepractice support model offered a range of benefits, including convenient service access and flexible learning options. Challenges included technology limitations and increased pressure on parents to coordinate home practice. Overall, parents reported that the telepractice program was a positive experience for them and their children. Findings indicated that telepractice is a promising mode of service delivery for those learning to use a new SGD. Further research in this area is warranted.

Acknowledgements
The authors wish to thank the four parents and their families for dedicating so much of their time, energy, and enthusiasm to this project. We also thank Dr. Liora Ballin for her assistance with collecting interview data.
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