An Adapted Assessment Model for Emergent Literacy Conducted via Telepractice Children with complex communication needs (CCN) exhibit multiple needs in a variety of domains, including language, literacy, and speech. Children with CCN often require augmentative/alternative communication (AAC), a mode of communication designed to compensate for the communication and related disability patterns of individuals with CCN (Light, Beukelman, & Reichle, 2003). ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 2015
An Adapted Assessment Model for Emergent Literacy Conducted via Telepractice
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Schea N. Fissel
    Pathology & Audiology, Kent State University, Kent, OH
  • Pamela R. Mitchell
    Pathology & Audiology, Kent State University, Kent, OH
  • Robin L. Alvares
    Communication Sciences and Disorders, Baldwin Wallace University, Berea, OH
  • Financial Disclosure: Schea N. Fissel is a clinical instructor and doctoral student at Kent State University. Pamela R. Mitchell is an associate professor at Kent State University. Robin L. Alvares is an assistant professor at Baldwin Wallace University.
    Financial Disclosure: Schea N. Fissel is a clinical instructor and doctoral student at Kent State University. Pamela R. Mitchell is an associate professor at Kent State University. Robin L. Alvares is an assistant professor at Baldwin Wallace University.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Schea N. Fissel has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article. Pamela R. Mitchell has previously published in the subject area. Robin L. Alvares has previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Schea N. Fissel has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article. Pamela R. Mitchell has previously published in the subject area. Robin L. Alvares has previously published in the subject area.×
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Normal Language Processing / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   September 01, 2015
An Adapted Assessment Model for Emergent Literacy Conducted via Telepractice
SIG 18 Perspectives on Telepractice, September 2015, Vol. 5, 48-56. doi:10.1044/tele5.2.48
History: Received March 2, 2015 , Accepted March 29, 2015
SIG 18 Perspectives on Telepractice, September 2015, Vol. 5, 48-56. doi:10.1044/tele5.2.48
History: Received March 2, 2015; Accepted March 29, 2015

Children with complex communication needs (CCN) exhibit multiple needs in a variety of domains, including language, literacy, and speech. Children with CCN often require augmentative/alternative communication (AAC), a mode of communication designed to compensate for the communication and related disability patterns of individuals with CCN (Light, Beukelman, & Reichle, 2003). Given the diverse needs of this population, service provision presents challenges to teachers and therapists alike. Telepractice service provision offers solutions to guide service delivery for children with CCN, who may be located in remote settings with limited access to AAC specialists. The tele-AAC working group of the International Society on Augmentative and Alternative Communication (ISAAC) 2012 Research Symposium highlighted a need for increased information on telepractice service delivery for children with CCN in the area of literacy. To date, evidence-based practices for assessment of literacy skills in children with CCN are limited. In addition, literacy assessment for children with CCN via telepractice presents challenges requiring adaptation for telepractice service delivery. This paper summarizes existing literature examining literacy assessment and intervention, and applies these principles to development and implementation of adapted literacy assessment methods conducted via telepractice for a child with CCN.

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